Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak* Some of the most radical criticism coming out of the West today is the result of an interested desire to conserve the subject of the West, or the West as Subject. Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak's original essay "Can the Subaltern Speak?" Can the Subaltern Speak? transformed the analysis of colonialism through an eloquent and uncompromising argument that affirmed the contemporary relevance of Marxism while using deconstructionist methods to explore the international division of labor and capitalism's "worlding" of the world. Can the Subaltern Speak?

transformed the analysis of colonialism through an eloquent and uncompromising argument that affirmed the contemporary relevance of Marxism while using deconstructionist methods to explore the international division of labor and capitalism's "worlding" of the world. Can the Subaltern Speak” Response Spivak’s article, while difficult to get through, brings up many interesting points.She ultimately comes to the conclusion that the subaltern cannot speak.Yet in coming to that conclusion she explains reasons why they cannot. Reflections on the History of an Idea began as a conference, hosted by the Institute for Research on Women and Gender, at Columbia University. Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak's original essay "Can the Subaltern Speak?" Spivak invokes the concepts of deconstruction (mainly of feminism) and rupture to write about "epistemic violence" while accepting that in doing so, she herself is not free from it. Early into the essay, Spivak asks the question, “Are those who act and struggle mute, as opposed to those who act and speak?” (70). Sure this may seem pedantic but I think this is exactly what Spivak is critiquing, namely white, male, intellectual, Western discourses that others and colours the subaltern thus making it difficult, if not impossible, for the subaltern to speak, resist and be acknowledged outside of the discursive terms of, to quote hooks, "imperialist, white supremacist, capitalist patriarchy."