Finally, ethical dilemmas which might face veterinarians who are asked by their clients to become involved in equine cloning …

cloning horses ethical even if cloning other animals is not so?

Secondly, the article considers whether there are any ethical arguments against cloning which apply to horses but not to other species, for example, arguments about sporting ethics. Horse cloning is commercially available today in North Amer-ica (US), South America (Argentina, Brazil and Colombia), Europe (Italy) and Australia. “We’re the only company in the world that is cloning cats for pet owners and the only company in the United States that is cloning pet dogs,” Dr. Ryan said. Champion geldings are an obvious choice, but fertile mares and stallions could also be chosen to start a line of cloned offspring. "It's real, and it's here and it works," said Blake Russell, vice president of business development at ViaGen, the only commercial firm in the world cloning horses. The idea of cloning a horse may sound fanciful at first, but the technology is there, and in some cases, there is good reason to take advantage of it.

Breeding is the main reason people are cloning horses [in order] to save valuable genetics so they can produce foals from those lines.

A very common reason for cloning is because an excellent champion horse is a gelding.

Finally, ethical dilemmas which might face veterinarians who are asked by their clients to become involved in equine cloning are presented. Second, cloning may prove useful in passing on the genetic material of an exceptional horse that is unable to breed.

Secondly, the article considers whether there are any ethical arguments against cloning which apply to horses but not to other species, for example, arguments about sporting ethics. The company began cloning pet dogs and cats in 2015. Dolly the sheep was cloned 22 years ago, in 1996, and ViaGen Pets has been cloning horses and livestock for 17 years. An estimated minimum number of. The entrepreneur behind the horse cloning, Texas businessman D Alan Meeker, told CBS that he’s “been asked by some of the wealthiest people on the planet to clone a human being”. Galli says cloning horses could help boost good breeds and might even help replicate equine champions. One of the first foals produced for this reason is a clone of Pieraz, endurance rider Valerie Kanavy’s Arabian gelding.