In this list the United States of America is excluded.

In addition, 28 U. S. states have already enacted laws making English their official language. Whereas the most people speak English or Spanish… This is why English should not be the official language of the United States. Read More

English might be viewed as the national language due to its popularity in America but that is not the case. And yet we’ve all heard the argument, “ This is America—speak English. 32 states have made laws giving official status to English, but there is no such law on the federal level.

For a major part of them English is a mother tongue.

The United States has never had an official language. Many assume that English is the official language of the United States. Although making English an official language would alleviate some problems , its disadvantages clearly outweigh its advantages. Making English the official language of the United States would create an all-American attitude. States does not have a designated official language. Fourthly, According to member supported Pro-English organization, English should be declared as the official language of United States in order to conform to the rest of the world. So, if there is to be one official language, English is clearly the most natural and logical choice. The linguistic diversity, tradition and culture immigrants bring to this country enrich the United States.

According to those who are in favor of making English our official language, it would unite Americans. Although it is perceived as an English speaking nation, there has been a ranging debate among the voting public as to whether English should be the official language.

Fifty-three of those nations have adopted English as their official language. ​While English might be the main language spoken in the U.S., it’s far from the only one. The U.S. has never had an official language since its foundation. Currently, the United States has no designated official language. The United States does not, at present, have an official language, English or otherwise, despite the heated argument and although approximately twenty states have their own statutes that declare English as the official language of the state (Macmillan & Tatalovich 239). English is an official language of at least 50 countries. Although it is perceived as an English-speaking nation, there has been a turbulent discussion among the American people as to whether English should be the official language. But despite efforts over the years, the United States has no official language. Interestingly, Eighty-five percent of the UN’s member nations have official languages.